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Actor’s access without demo reel?

Actor’s access without demo reel?

Posted on Nov 22nd

Does it make sense to join actor’s access without a demo reel? And also how can I go about getting one? Will putting together a collection of monologues work?

Should characters be played by actors who represent their reality?

Should characters be played by actors who represent their reality?

Posted on Nov 22nd

By that I mean a queer character being played by a queer actor, a trans character being played by a trans actor, a handicapped character being played by a handicapped actor, etc. But obviously not for BIPOC because it’s actually about the casting and we are not going to put white people in blackface, that would be awful. As a queer autistic person, I used to think that characters should be played by people who represent their reality but I changed my mind. Here’s why. 1. I want to get the role because I was the best actor, not because they feel bad for me and think I need some kind of help. I would be insulted if I was hired just because I was queer/autistic even though they didn’t think I was good. 2. It wouldn’t make sense to hire someone who has no acting experience/training and who is not a fit for the job just because they represent that reality. The person needs to actually be good (and tons of diverse people are) otherwise it won’t make the character look any better. Giving someone a lead role when they are not ready and don’t have the support required to do the job will do more damage to their acting career instead of helping them. However, when the person is diverse AND a good actor, they will naturally be better for the role. 3. A diverse person is not necessarily more aware of how to represent this diversity in a good way. They are aware of their own story but not necessarily of everyones reality. This could lead to more stereotypes. Some queer people are also disrespectful to other members of the queer community for example. I’d rather see an autistic character played well by a neurotypical person than played badly by an autistic person. When I want to play a sex worker for example, instead of having them hire real sex workers, I say that I am not only a trained and experienced actor, but I am also trained in pole dance, burlesque, striptease, and lap dance, have met real sex workers to represent them well, studied sexual health at university to represent them well and have all the costume and accessories they need. This makes me more skilled than a real sex worker to play the role. 4. The problem is often in the storyline and not by how the role is played. We need consultants who help screenwriters more than we need real people playing a role written stereotypically. 5. Casting real people can lead to more discrimination. I have often been told that I can’t play autistic/queer roles because I don’t look queer/autistic even though I am. Some actors really are gay but pretend they are straight to avoid discrimination so it would be weird to force them to come out to play those roles. Are we really going to ask if someone is trans/gay/handicapped at the audition? Being so publicly open about it could lead them to face more discrimination. 6. What if we want to show a handicapped person before they were handicapped? A trans person before their transition? A person in a wheelchair who dreams they can walk? That won’t always be possible with a real person. 7. Queer/trans/handicapped/etc people risk being type cast by their identity when they wish they could play normal roles too. The cashier at the grocery store who has two lines can be played by anyone so why look for a specific casting? Some people say it’s unfair to give « normal » people queer/trans/handicapped roles because these are the only roles queer/trans/handicapped people can play. The real solution is opening « normal » roles to diverse people too. Let’s hire the best actor for the role. That’s it.

SAG-AFTRA agents

SAG-AFTRA agents

Posted on Nov 22nd

So despite really wanting to be an actor, I don't really know how an acting career works. How does one actually qualify and contract SAG-AFTRA for an agent?

Is there a zoom class that is all about self taping? I don't want to do any acting in the class- just watching each other's self tapes and then re taping them and sharing them again.

Is there a zoom class that is all about self taping? I don't want to do any acting in the class- just watching each other's self tapes and then re taping them and sharing them again.

Posted on Nov 22nd

I took a class like this with Randy Kovitz over the summer and really enjoyed it but he's not teaching it again. I also liked Anthony Robert Grasso's class. I audited it. But he doesn't do self tapes. They just prepare for self tapes by rehearsing in class.  I liked his style but he doesn't teach a self tape class. Is there a group online somewhere that is free- where people post their self tapes and then give feedback and then repost them? I find this really helpful to watch as both an actor and director.

Is going for a Masters worth it?! (Scotland)

Is going for a Masters worth it?! (Scotland)

Posted on Nov 21st

Hello. I’m a 22 (M) actor from Scotland! I’m currently doing an all theory theatre course at university (BA Performance) but we get to devise our own work and occasionally get workshops. I am thinking of applying for a masters in a few years as I’m in my third year in university. I did try out for one drama school (RCS for BA) but got rejected as I didn’t want to apply to lots of universities and get overwhelmed as I’m dyspraxic and wanted to pass my final year at college. I got rejected with all of the other practical courses apart from one reserve offer. We don’t get a showcase at my uni but you get to make your own website & showreel during my final year. I’m currently apart of a Youth Theatre company that occasionally gets professional work opportunities and we get to work with people from the RCS Alumni. I’m unsure either to go for the Masters in RCS (Contemporary and Classical Text) or the MFA Stage and Screen Acting (Napier) The masters at Royal Welsh looked very interesting as well. Do I think I should go for it?! I feel like I’m lacking the practical aspect of my course despite getting an A in my HND Acting and Performance and being told I’m good actor (comedy typed cast)

What is a Recording live session in Voice over?

What is a Recording live session in Voice over?

Posted on Nov 21st

So I was talking with a professional voice actor some days ago regarding work and she asked will this recording be a live session and I had no idea what that meant. I mean I can sort of guess by the words but I didn't knew if I was right in terms of voice over or which way it will be beneficial for me? So I thought if you guys can tell me what does this mean it would be helpful for my project to choose the better option. Thanks in advance!

Questions to Actors from Ontario / Toronto

Questions to Actors from Ontario / Toronto

Posted on Nov 21st

I’m a teenager and my drama teacher suggested me to become an actor because she thinks I’m pretty good. She also told me to start doing background work to get experience on set so that after high school, I will start working in actual movies/tv shows. She didn’t tell me how because she hasn’t acted since some time and just focused on teaching so how do I star as a background actor in Toronto? I don’t really care about money, I just want some experience like she said. Thanks :)

Acting and Copywork

Acting and Copywork

Posted on Nov 20th

I posted this in r/theatre but it got flagged for spam. I thought I might try posting it here. I have some food for thought. I think acting can be taught by having your actors imitate good performances; I also think feeding them line readings can be incredibly useful. I have come across this method called "copywork." Writers use this method to improve their own writing by copying their favorite authors; they study the authors and try to understand how they write. I think the best way to teach acting is to have your actors imitate their favorite performances. We're so lucky to live with the technology we have today. Some of the best performances of all time are preserved on film and online; it'd be ridiculous not to devour, copy, steal, and reverse-engineer these good performances! If artists, writers, and athletes can learn by copying "the masters," then why can't actors? Actors will learn how to think like a good actor by copying and reverse-engineering good performances; they'll start to understand why some acting choices work and why some don't; they'll learn how to react; they'll learn how to create compelling characters. I've been imitating a scene from Timothée Chalamet's performance in Prodigal Son and it's crazy how much I've learned. I'd ask myself questions like: why does he emphasize this word; why does he snap his fingers here; why does he does he repeat this gesture; what is he thinking when he says this line? I also started to feel pretty emotional. I may not have been expressing the exact emotion Timothée was, but at least I was experiencing something. The goal of imitation is to understand why the performance works. Getting fed lines by your director can feel patronizing. I know. But, I think line readings can save tons of time in rehearsal. I was listening to a podcast recently and a director was talking about how important it is to not tip-toe around your critique when you're giving acting notes. This same director is also against giving actors line readings--he is a fan of coaxing actors to do what he wants. Coaxing is fine; it gives actors ownership. However, I don't like how coaxing feels like tip-toeing. It can be incredibly frustrating when you've tried everything to coax your actors but nothing works. I think it's okay to be direct and show the actor exactly what you want. Peter Brook has a method of giving his actors line readings. Once the actor perfectly recreates the line reading, he tells them to forget it and do it differently. The purpose is to get the actor to understand exactly what the director wants. Once the actor has the blueprint they are free to do what they want; they can emphasize this word but not this one; they can omit this gesture; they can add another objective. If you're a theatre teacher or acting teacher I would love to hear your thoughts on this!

Auditions for faith based films when you are not known as a faith based actor.

Auditions for faith based films when you are not known as a faith based actor.

Posted on Nov 20th

Complete waste of time. They only want to work with people that have the same beliefs as them, which they have every right to do. Thoughts?

Tips For Your First Time Being an Extra on Set

Tips For Your First Time Being an Extra on Set

Posted on Nov 20th

This post is for anyone who's going to be an extra (also called "background") on a TV or film set for the first time. It'll tell you what to expect, how to prepare, and what to do and not do while working on set. I've been an extra many times (it's how I first got started). Here's some tips, advice, and insights from my own experience, doing background work in Los Angeles: 1. **If they ask for wardrobe options**, bring 4-5 shirts and maybe 2-3 pants. Pick different styles and colors. Make sure there's no logos, images, or artwork on them. Nothing that could potentially be a trademark or copyright issue. Usually a regular pair of shoes is fine (as long as they don't show a big logo and/or stand out with bright colors or something). Never hurts to bring a second option though. The costume people will LOVE you for bringing "too many" options -- but at the same time, remember, you gotta bring \*everything\* with you to "holding" (more on that below), and there's probably limited space. So, generally, 3-5 shirt/pants options is great. 2. **"Holding" is this space they have all the extras wait**, when they're not needed on set. It may be nearby where they're filming, or it could be far away. Holding will be your second home. You will either be on set, in holding, or in the bathroom -- NEVER go wandering off anywhere else, ever. 3. **If you have to go to the bathroom**, let a Production Assistant ("PA") or your Assistant Director ("AD") know first. If one of them isn't around, then let a few other extras know in case the PA or AD comes looking for you to call you to set. On a film set, you'll learn they've got special codes and nicknames for everything. A bathroom break is called a "10-1". That means you're taking a quick pee and should be back in a couple minutes. (And you guessed it, #2 is a "10-2", but try to avoid that on set if possible. It happens, we're all human -- but, if you gotta, just be quick about it.) 4. **Always be aware of your volume.** While you're in holding, you'll probably have other extras to talk with. Sometimes it's easy to not realize how loud you're getting. If you're anywhere near set, you may hearing them yell "quiet on set" or a PA may come and tell you to be quiet. If that happens, just SHUT UP, be quiet, and whisper "sorry." That's all you need to do. They don't need big apologies or explanations or anything. They just need it quiet so they can get the shot. If it happens, don't feel bad. Again, we're all human. Just be careful to keep the volume down thereafter. 5. **You may be in holding all day -- or barely ever at all.** I've literally spent an entire 12 hour day on set and NEVER left holding. You get paid whether you get seen on camera or not. So that's cool! But it also kinda balances things -- because some days, you're on set ALL DAY, running around and yelling and doing high energy things. Those days are exhausting. So if you get a day where you can relax in holding for several straight hours... ENJOY and APPRECIATE that! 6. **You may want to bring a book to read.** Lots of experienced extras do. If you want to listen to music or play games on your phone, use earbuds -- but make sure you can also easily hear the PA or AD if they call for you. 7. **NEVER EVER take a nap. Ever. You're there to work.** Some days it may be slow and boring. You may be tired because of a super early call time or you're in a dark quiet room or whatever... Some days, honestly, the most difficult thing about being an extra is staying awake. 8. When they call you, be ready to drop whatever you're doing (reading, playing a game, etc) and jump to your feet, ready to go to work. They may call for you specifically, or they may call for your "category." So the PA or AD may say, "Okay, I need all of Group C" or "Police officers, detectives, office workers, you're up!" **Know your category and be ready for whenever they call for it.** 9. The PA or AD will then escort you to set. They will tell you where to stand or sit. They will tell you, "on action, walk over there" or some other instruction. There will probably be a rehearsal, but not always. Either way, don't be nervous. You're literally part of the "background" to help bring the scene to life, but all the focus will be on the "principal" (speaking) actors. (Unless, of course, you're "featured"; more on that next.) **Your only job is to look as natural and human as possible, without making ANY noise at all** (even if you're "talking" with another extra in your scene; always do pantomime, always stay quiet). Just don't look into the camera and you'll probably be fine. :) 10. **If you are "featured"**, that means you're still a non-speaking extra, but the camera will focus on you for a bit. Usually they ask for volunteers to be featured. If you're nervous and/or just prefer to disappear into the crowd, then don't volunteer. But sometimes the PA or AD will request you specifically. (It could be your look, wardrobe, the right height, any number of reasons.) If you're REALLY super nervous and uncomfortable, tell them that. They'll either help you relax or find somebody else who does feel ready. But remember: it's film. If you or anybody messes something up, they'll just cut and try again for another take. It's totally common to feel nervous and excited the first time you're on set. But we're all here just to tell a story and we get multiple chances to get it right. So relax, have fun, enjoy yourself. 11. Unless a PA or AD tells you to change what you're doing, **KEEP DOING whatever you're doing**, take after take. It's common to feel tempted to ask, "Did I do it right? Want me to try anything different?" But you should always assume, if you get no notes/instructions to change anything, then they like what you're doing and you should keep doing the same thing each take. However, sometimes (often) they will tell you to make changes and adjustments. That doesn't mean you did anything wrong, either. It could just be the director didn't like the timing of something or how it looked in camera. In fact, **EXPECT there to be changes**. They are super common on a film set. Always listen to and do whatever your PA or AD tells you to do. It's never hard or complicated. It's usually "pretend to be talking to that person" or "walk from here to there" or "pretend to be working at this computer". 12. **Extras come in all shapes, sizes, and backgrounds.** Some have a lot of experience. Some have little or none. Some talk a big game about how important and special they are, how they acted across from some celebrity, how they're working on some big indie film project of their own, they're gonna be a star someday, etc, etc... Other extras more or less keep to themselves, stay quiet in holding, and do their job on set with no fuss or issues. It's those latter types you want to be like. THOSE are the professionals. They're there to work. Not to network, try to get "upgraded" to a speaking role, have their face seen on camera, or anything else. They're there to be an extra, period -- and do whatever the PA or AD tells them to do when the cameras are rolling. 13. **Never, ever, EVER complain.** For some reason, extras are notorious for bitching, whining, and complaining about EVERYTHING. Oh my God. PLEASE don't be one of them. "It's too cold, it's too hot, I had to wake up too early to get here, the craft services suck, there's no craft services, when's lunch, when are we gonna wrap???" ... You may think nobody's listening, but trust me, there is a PA or AD (or other crew person) nearby... and they hear EVERYTHING. Being an extra is one of the EASIEST jobs IN THE WORLD! You literally get paid to sit, eat free food, and talk with your friends sometimes. You get to be on movie and TV sets. Work side by side with major celebrities sometimes. Wear fun cool costumes sometimes. You get paid to look pretty and walk past a camera when the director calls action. That's your job. APPRECIATE it. Be grateful. There are millions of people who would do anything to be where you are right now. 14. **Don't talk to principal actors unless they initiate a conversation with you first.** Remember, they're there to work too, and they've got a ton of lines to deliver, emotions to emote, and carry the success of the film partly on their backs. Some principal actors like to stay focused and go straight to work. Others may stop by and say hello to the extras. If a principal actor starts talking with you, never ask for an autograph or selfie, or fan-gush all over them, or anything like that. You're both on the same film set. You're both film professionals now. See them as a co-worker. But let them lead the conversation, and as soon as they want/need to go, let them go. 15. **Do not take pictures on set, unless you get permission from the AD first.** Most professional sets have a strict "no photos" policy. But some of the small to medium size ones might allow it, but always get permission first. If you absolutely must take a photo of yourself in costume, then do it in holding against a neutral, blank background... and do not post it to social media until AFTER the show/film has released. Even if your privacy is set to "friends only" or something -- once something's on the internet, it has a life of its own and sometimes gets shared by well-meaning people who are just happy, excited for, and proud of you... and then someone from the film production office somehow discovers you just "leaked" something about their movie, and you can get into trouble. Never, ever take photos that include the actual film set or any other actors in the production. Unless, of course, you get everyone's permission first. 16. **If you don't know or understand something**, or aren't sure what to do, JUST ASK a PA or AD. They'd rather you pause for a minute to understand what they mean or how to do what they want, than for cameras to start rolling and then have you do it completely wrong. No one gets upset when someone asks for clarification. 17. When cameras start rolling, extras usually start moving before "action" is called. **Extras begin their action when you hear the AD say "background".** Then "action" is called for the principal actors to begin. There's a whole list of things they say before the scene actually happens. You'll hear "picture's up!" and "roll sound" and "sound speeds" and "roll camera" followed by "rolling". Usually all the PAs will yell, "rolling, rolling!" Including ones on a radio, far away from the actual set. So no matter where you are (in holding, on set, hair & make-up department, etc), everybody knows when the cameras are rolling and they're going for a take. Then they'll say "background" followed by "action". Stay in character until you hear "cut!" 18. **Now let's talk about food.** Usually nearby holding will be the "craft services" table, which includes an assortment of snacks and drinks. There's usually water bottles and soda, fresh fruit, granola bars, chips, coffee, tea, bagels... It really depends on the day and production, but those are some common staples. If you're not needed momentarily on set, those snacks are there for you to enjoy too. Craft services are for everyone, so obviously, take what you want but leave plenty to share with others. That food is meant to help keep your energy and morale up, because some days get LOOOOOOONG and exhausting. On really big shoots, there may be separate craft services -- one for the union extras and film crew, and one for all the non-union extras. Never complain. (See #13.) It's still free food. 19. For actual meals (breakfast, lunch, and/or dinner as the case may be), extras eat LAST. The crew works much harder and longer hours than you do. They also have to rush back to set first. So let the crew and principal actors be first in line to get their meal. There is always plenty of food. Usually food goes to waste and gets thrown out. So no worries. Just be patient. You may be tired and hungry. So is everyone else. **Extras are at the end of the food line.** That's just how it goes. (But if it makes you feel any better, the PAs actually eat after you -- and they are usually the first to arrive on set and the last to leave after a long day too. PAs are so under appreciated... but it's the entry job that opens up doors to all the better crew positions.) 20. **Be on time or early.** If your call time is 6:00 AM, then be there by 5:30 to 5:45 AM... You don't know what the parking situation is gonna be like. You might get lost trying to find the place. There could be a long line from all the other extras and crew members arriving at the same time. It's better to be an hour early than 5 minutes late. Unfortunately, you only get paid starting at your actual call time, not whenever you first arrive. If you get there early, the PAs will appreciate and respect you, and tell you just to wait until they're ready to start checking people in. 21. **When you check in, you'll receive a "voucher"** \-- it's a piece of paper that logs your hours and tells the payroll company who to send the paycheck to. Hang onto it, don't lose it. When you're wrapped, the PA will sign you out and record your actual, final total hours. You'll keep a carbon copy of your voucher for your records. You should receive your check in the mail in 1-2 weeks, usually. Your voucher is proof that you were there and how much money you earned. You get a new voucher for each day you work on set. 22. **Expect to work 12+ hours.** Much of that time could be spent in holding, talking with other extras, eating free food, playing games on your phone... But it's very common to be there for 12 or more hours. But usually not more than 16. After 16 hours, it starts getting REALLY expensive for the production. The union actors and crew members start what's called "golden time" -- they get paid a full day rate for every hour they work past that. So needless to say, production companies don't like paying that if it can be avoided. But 12-15 hour days are fairly common. Sometimes, however, you may only work 3-4 hours. It's super rare, but it does happen. I don't know where you're filming, but on professional productions in Los Angeles, they guarantee you'll make 8 hours worth of wages, no matter what. So even if they send you home after 4 hours, you still get paid for a full 8 hour shift! (Again, another reason never to complain about this job!) But... they'll only send you home early if they're absolutely sure they won't need you anymore. Often, they'll be "done" with you after a few hours, but keep you around "just in case." And then right before you're about to go into overtime, somebody will come and say, "okay, you're wrapped!" Okay, I know I threw A LOT of information at you. And every production works slightly differently. But this will give you a good idea of what to expect, how things work, and proper protocol as an extra. Personally, I loved being an extra for quite a while. It's super fun. Eventually I grew into principal roles and only do those now. But background acting will always hold a special place in my heart and memory. I'm grateful for the experience. If you think you may want to become a principal actor or part of the film crew someday, take this opportunity as an extra to observe and learn as much as you can. Just stay quiet, out of the way, and ready to work whenever you're called. You'll do great! Just relax, have fun, and be a part of the movie magic! Welcome to the industry! :)

Need a good laugh ??

Need a good laugh ??

Posted on Nov 20th

Hello all! Fellow actor here Shameless self promotion, but I've recently turned my Instagram into a comedy page. If you are in need of a good laugh, check it out

In order to be successful in the film industry as an actor, do I need to put myself in a box?

In order to be successful in the film industry as an actor, do I need to put myself in a box?

Posted on Nov 20th

Hi, my name is Noah and I’m an actor. Here is what I have going on… I’m a big guy. Not big as in width but big as in length. I’m 6’8” and 270 pounds. I was diagnosed with diabetes 5 years ago which caused a decrease in my muscle mass. Long story short, I look like a tall stick with gynecomastia and I’m 25. My agent and manager submit me for projects that require either the “fat guy” or “muscular guy.” As a diabetic, I can’t afford to be the fat guy. I have the option of being a normal me. But I also have the option of being the muscular. Do I change what I look like in order to have a career or do I stay the way I am hoping that it doesn’t matter?

Can voice actors give me tips on how to imitate Woods from CoD BO?

Can voice actors give me tips on how to imitate Woods from CoD BO?

Posted on Nov 20th

I'm not a VA but I really want to learn to do Wood's voice from Call of Duty Black Ops ([https://youtu.be/W0s\_WEPsnrQ](https://youtu.be/W0s_WEPsnrQ)). Do you guys have any tips?

Is your Zoom attention span waning?

Is your Zoom attention span waning?

Posted on Nov 19th

I'm an actor, but also I own a taping studio that offers classes and workshops. We have been doing a mix of in-person and Zoom offerings this Fall, and I'm just curious to actors out there if your tolerance for Zoom is approaching zero?Just wondering as we enter 2022 if it makes any sense to continue virtual offerings. It certainly helps those who are not local to Atlanta that still want to partake, or to the immunocompromised who still don't feel safe in small gatherings. But as a business, it becomes a cost/benefit analysis. Any feedback is appreciated!

New Acting Podcast!

New Acting Podcast!

Posted on Nov 19th

Hey Stage 32 friends!Last week, I asked about your best acting coaches.Well, I am thrilled to share that my friend, SAG-AFTRA actor, and acting coach Casey Llyod just launched his new podcast https://caseylloyd.com/podcast - check it out!While there are many valuable podcasts out there, I can definitely advcocate for Casey's ethical stances and aesthetic viewpoints that you might find supportive. For more, watch Casey along with my fabulous panelists on the Centre for Media and Celebrity Studies (CMCS) YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cZ01SYlIhgE&t=7s IG @cmcs_mediaThat's all for now!Have a wonderful weekend and let me know what you think of Casey's podcast!

Whats is the LinkedIn equivalent platform for aspiring actors?

Whats is the LinkedIn equivalent platform for aspiring actors?

Posted on Nov 19th

What platforms do aspiring actors use for networking and connecting with fellow aspiring actors or people interested in the craft of acting? Other than participating in my university's theatre extracurricular, I am having a difficult time finding new ways to make new connections. I'm more interested in the film aspect of acting.

Can we all add the Anime Series in the Behind the Voice Actors website?

Can we all add the Anime Series in the Behind the Voice Actors website?

Posted on Nov 19th

If anyone was is reading this, This is my first time being in this Website and I want to tell this to you guys anyway about something that I really want to happen possible, For Anyone who gets this, I have been a Fan of the Franchise since I was very young and I always want to find ways to share and spread this to world more often and I want to make this possible but I need your Help, For Anyone who is aware of this website, It's a Place where you can look up on your Favorite Voice Actors and many other places, but there is only one negative thing I find in this Place, there are only 3 Precure Series in this and yet the whole franchise is not in here at all, So I am asking you this, If anyone knows this website and can add all the Precure Tv Series and Varies in this Place, I greatly would appreciate a lot very much and that would make the series more popular when it is spread around the internet, and trust me, if it was added here, the media would go crazy on it, So Please, this is what I am asking for, Please try to do it, it would mean so very much to me if it would really happen. https://www.behindthevoiceactors.com/

How much experience does a child actor need to sign with an agent?

How much experience does a child actor need to sign with an agent?

Posted on Nov 19th

Basically the title. I have some experience, but I'm wondering how much more I should get before I contact an agency?

Headshot-Age Range-Character Type Feedback

Headshot-Age Range-Character Type Feedback

Posted on Nov 18th

Use this thread to post your headshots for feedback, get info on your age range/type, find good headshot photographers, ask any questions you may have about headshots. If you are posting a DIY headshot for feedback, and not just a snapshot in order to get feedback on your age range/type/etc, it is advised that you do at least some basic research on what actor headshots look like--composition, framing, lighting. You will find a Google Image search for "actor headshots" to be very helpful for this. Non-professional shots are fine for age/typecasting; please keep in mind that one picture is a difficult way to go about this. Video of you moving and speaking would be ideal, but understandably more difficult to post. For what it's worth, the branding workshop at SAG-AFTRA recommends a five-year age range. That's inclusive, so for example 19-23, 25-29, 34-38, etc.

Taking your own headshots.

Taking your own headshots.

Posted on Nov 18th

This isn’t really anything I considered before but my old acting teacher sent me an email over to send headshots and a bit about myself into a well known British tv show on Netflix which is looking for trans actors (I’m a 24 year old trans man), there is no acting experience required. Could I have some advice on how to take some headshots please? I’m a photographer and I have a very good DSLR, this is just something I have no experience with! Thanks

Imposter syndrome anyone?

Imposter syndrome anyone?

Posted on Nov 18th

So, I started working with the local cast of a national murder mystery theater comapny a couple months ago, and I'm really loving every minute of it. So far I've been playing side suspect characters that have an important clue or really just add flavor to the story. But recently, I've gotten cast as the lead in character in a couple shows. The one in charge of driving the story and helping the audience follow along. And I'm starting to get really nervous, thinging I'm not ready to be thrust into the spotlight like this. I've been stress reading the script over and over, trying to nail down all the beats and moments and make sure I'm introducing suspects in the right order for them to give their clues correctly. I'm so worried that I'll screw it all up. When those of you working actors out there got your first "big role" where the show really depended on you, did you have thoughts of I'm not ready? That it can't be you because you're just a supporting character actor and not a main guy and someone must have screwed up somewhere to think you'd be ready for this already?

Rarely do I get starstruck..

Rarely do I get starstruck..

Posted on Nov 18th

But I just signed with my manager less than a month ago and today I just received my first Tyler Perry audition. As a black actor, this is huge to me

Background actors, if you don’t get work on a given week, can you get unemployment for that week? Anyone have experience with that?

Background actors, if you don’t get work on a given week, can you get unemployment for that week? Anyone have experience with that?

Posted on Nov 18th

I live in Los Angeles for reference, and do both central casting and calling service. I just am curious to see if it’s reasonable to get a week of unemployment every once in a while

Submitting to union projects as non-union

Submitting to union projects as non-union

Posted on Nov 18th

I’m a non-union actor and am decently proactive about submitting to roles for non-union film/theatre work. I’m wondering though if I’m allowed to submit to EPA auditions for theatre and SAG projects for film (I need 2 more waivers to be SAG-eligible). What’s the likelihood that I’d be seen or taken seriously? Any advice would be greatly appreciated as I haven’t been able to find a straight answer. Thank you!

Preparation for a Role

Preparation for a Role

Posted on Nov 18th

Hey! I want to ask about how long can an actor prepare for a role? In my opinion, to get into a character takes time but I also heard that many actors have only a week for the preparation so what’s the average?

Best way to choose your "Best" Headshot

Best way to choose your "Best" Headshot

Posted on Nov 18th

I'm referring to selecting which Headshot as your primary photo when submitting to Actors Access and Backstage. - I think picking the one that best suits the role makes sense first and foremost. - - I've heard some sites say use tinder and put up both photos for the same amount of days to see which gets more swipes. If it's one photo by a landslide over the other then thats an answer. (I don't believe this necessarily because that's more for modeling. I do think "approachability" is a factor as well as, "this person looks like someone I could tolerate for 12hrs straight") - - Personally, I alternate dates submitting for everything I can with one photo. Then the next day with another photo. At the end of the week I look to see which got more audition requests. - - And for some actors, you have one really amazing headshot that stands above the rest so it could be an easy pick for you. What's your process for deciding on your default photo and primary photos you submit with?

Do you think big actors get frustrated when they’re always associated with a single project?

Do you think big actors get frustrated when they’re always associated with a single project?

Posted on Nov 18th

Like Emma Watson regardless of what movie she does she’ll always be thought of as Hermione. Like Vin Diesel with Dom or Chris Hemsworth as Thor. They can never really step out of their character’s shadow.

It's Wednesday why not get silly!

It's Wednesday why not get silly!

Posted on Nov 17th

https://youtu.be/LNV9fVYDjI0

Is it more difficult to get started at 27 then it is at, lets say 21?

Is it more difficult to get started at 27 then it is at, lets say 21?

Posted on Nov 17th

I'm still an aspiring actor, but I don't have an agent, and my last (and only) gig was a commercial gig 2 years ago. I've been doing loads of extras work on the side but Im starting to wonder If I should approach work differently than 6 years ago, but then again maybe its all in my head. Also I have a fear that I have forgotten how to act as I was not practicing during the lockdown.

New actor - stay in San Diego or move to LA?

New actor - stay in San Diego or move to LA?

Posted on Nov 17th

Hello all, I wanted the opinion of anybody working in LA right now or who moved from San Diego to LA for acting. I'm a young professional who has some job offers to work in LA. Because a lot of things are virtual at the moment (including classes), would it be worth it to move to LA? I'm interested in taking improv and acting classes, which I know LA has some of the best options for this, but most of them are virtual anyways right now. Also, because I don't have much experience, I'm aware a lot of people recommend not to move to LA until you have some experience. Should I move to LA right now with most things being virtual classes/self-tapes and get any in-person experience I can with the currently available fewer options for classes. Or should I wait 1-2 years while building experience in SD? Appreciate any thoughts!

Racist role?

Racist role?

Posted on Nov 17th

Hey! I got cast in a student film as a suuuuper creepy racist role. Basically I would put on “Asian face” at some point during the film. Potentially taping my eyes to be more narrow, and caking my face in white makeup. I’m a new actor, would this be really fucked up of me to do? I’ve got an agent and manager and I don’t feel comfortable asking them just yet if I should do this or not.

In a short film, would it be wrong to ask for a name?

In a short film, would it be wrong to ask for a name?

Posted on Nov 17th

I'm in a short film where I have more lines than the lead character. I think I'm working with a first time filmmaker, they didn't specify. They said they are doing this for diversity and so that all the actors on this can be discovered. Would it be wrong to just ask for a name instead of being called "Brother 2?" It's incredibly irritating but maybe they aren't thinking about it. I just worry it could risk me losing the role. I've played enough no-name roles in the last 10years, my imdb is already littered with horrible choices lol.

Commercial Auditions slowing down in LA?

Commercial Auditions slowing down in LA?

Posted on Nov 17th

Wondering if this is the time of year Union commercial and/or theatrical auditions slow down? Is there a time where they just aren’t shooting anything in LA due to the holidays? Someone told me it’s good to stay in town during December since many people aren’t available but I’m not sure if that’s true for SAG actors as well?

Non-USA citizen wondering about Unions

Non-USA citizen wondering about Unions

Posted on Nov 17th

I wouldn't even call myself a new actor as yet as I have no on-paper experience. I'm from a small Caribbean island and acting isn't really a huge industry over here. I self-tape, take online acting classes, study techniques, etc. I think I have so much potential. I really want to start off somewhere but I guess asking/reaching out for help right now is a good way to start. I've been researching Non-American Actors in Hollywood for over a year now and I really haven't gotten any real answers as yet. I read in order to get a good agent and build your career or even get into high-profiled films in the future you need a union? My country/region does not have anything like that and I was wondering if I can legally get into any Union in the USA. Even Canada or the Uk would be good for me. I just want a stepping stone or a guide on what to do next. I feel very stuck but I'm not going to lose hope

Dealing With Conspiracy Driven Family Members.

Dealing With Conspiracy Driven Family Members.

Posted on Nov 17th

Delete if not allowed. I'm an aspiring actress that would love to one day be in real movies or on real tv shows. I've mostly done plays and student films but have started taking it more serious and am joining a union. Some of my family members are trying to scare me into crazy Q anon theories about Hollywood and how it's evil and run by pedos and I should stay away and I told them that every workplace and business has some form of corruption and that these crazy demonic theories have been around forever. I wont lie though, it does scare me and sometimes makes me not wanna even try to take my acting further even though I know the theories are insane. Can anyone else relate?

Would it be super unprofessional to show up to a set as a fan?

Would it be super unprofessional to show up to a set as a fan?

Posted on Nov 17th

So I'm going to New York this week for an anime convention, and then I get word that one of my favorite shows is filming somewhere else in New York, and if I'm in the right part of NYC at the right time, I could potentially watch them film and/or interact with some of the actors. But I also want to be a professional actor, on a level with this show's cast. I'm obviously not going over there with an 8x10 glossy and asking to be on the show or anything like that, I just want to watch them film as a fan and maybe get a selfie with the actors if they'll let me. Would that hurt any of my future prospects as an actor, or am I okay?

"Pinned" or "On Hold"

"Pinned" or "On Hold"

Posted on Nov 17th

On the topic of being "pinned," do you typically hear back from casting when they would like to release you from the pin (for specific dates) if they go with another actor? Or is this like most things in the industry where you should assume you won't hear unless you book?

New voice actor

New voice actor

Posted on Nov 17th

I’m fairly new into the whole voice acting process. I’m taking classes and stuff to refine my voice. I’ve already been stage acting for years. I’m just wondering how is the best process for getting auditions. I don’t really care how big or if they are paid. I’m just wondering if there is a trustworthy site to visit? Any help would be welcome no matter how small.

Got dropped by my manager of 3 years. I am very sad and feeling insecure about my acting/passion for it

Got dropped by my manager of 3 years. I am very sad and feeling insecure about my acting/passion for it

Posted on Nov 16th

Ugh… idk where to start. I lived in La for 4 years moved back home (couple hours away from La) because I lost my job and figured I could do self tapes from home anyways since that’s the new norm. I can honestly say this year I’ve been rejecting more audition offers (due to me not living in La, not being interested in the role, very low pay… Not enough for me to travel, family obligations, and my mental health has been at an all time low) My manager dropping me today has me re-evaluating my whole life. I can’t help but feel like a failure. I can’t help but feel like I wasted 4 years in La. First year was a complete joke. I was 23 years old spending 5 days a week closing a bar until 3 am and could barely make ends meet. Couldn’t afford an acting class. My friend told me our mutual friend asked her “does she even pursue acting anymore”. It broke me. I was constantly in survival mode while I watched that same girl pull money out of her trust fund account and solely focus on acting. The second year was bad. Finally 2019, I started getting into bigger auditions, studio lots, call backs (still non union) but no solid bookings! Yet I felt confident and was finally seeing the light at the end of the tunnel. Covid hit, I spent a whole year stuck in my apartment. Came home, unemployed, booked one gig all year through my manager. I know I wasn’t putting my all into acting. I am more focused on my mental health and making money in hopes of living a better quality of life and hopefully will be able to be in a more comfortable state of mind, enough to whole heartedly chase acting again. I just can’t help but feel like maybe I just suck. 4 years in La did some work, most was shit. I didn’t even see end result for so many project. Self tapes give me anxiety. When I was in La, I would get my tapes done at a studio. Now I’m home I have no actor friends to help. I don’t want to pay someone off we audition to help me. It makes me uncomfortable not knowing the person and it doesn’t even feel like I am connecting with my reader responding through a screen. I hope I am not losing my passion. I am afraid I am…

[Casting] Need actors with animals / pets!

[Casting] Need actors with animals / pets!

Posted on Nov 16th

I own a creative ad agency called [Airtraffic](https://airtraffic.co) and we work with a lot of mobile app/gaming clients. Right now we are producing a series of short TikTok style video ads for a client, and they call for people with pets or animals. The videos are all remote / self-filmed using your phone. The animals vary from dogs and cats to horses, fish, birds, cows, snakes, turtles, goats, and even a tarantula. The videos are fairly short - around 20-30sec - so they should take maybe 30min of your time to produce. These are all paid gigs. Contract is full buyout but we do not limit your ability to work on similar productions in the future (i.e. other mobile or gaming products). If you have an animal and are available, please email [talent@airtraffic.co](mailto:talent@airtraffic.co) or send me a message here. Thank you!

Looking for LA Actors for Student Interview

Looking for LA Actors for Student Interview

Posted on Nov 16th

Hi r/acting! I'm an undergraduate currently pursuing a degree in acting. As part of a project for my Business of Acting class, I'm supposed to interview professional actors who work in LA. I would be asking questions about their experience in the business and what it's like to live in LA. If there are any professionals on here interested in giving an interview, either over email or Zoom, DM me! I'd also greatly appreciate any advice on how to get in touch with actors in the LA area. Thanks!

Actors working for casting directors?

Actors working for casting directors?

Posted on Nov 16th

Do any of you work in casting offices or with casting directors? If so how did you get in and does that hurt your career or help it?

Acting Ability or Political Correctness?

Acting Ability or Political Correctness?

Posted on Nov 16th

I have seen several instances where a person of one race voices a character of another race, and it being considered offensive/racist. One example of this is the character Missy in Big Mouth. This character was originally voiced by a white woman, but was replaced by an African American woman due to backlash of it being considered "offensive". What are your thoughts on this? Is it considered offensive for a person to voice a character of a different race, or should it be based on the the talent of the actor rather than race?

Question About Mandy.com

Question About Mandy.com

Posted on Nov 15th

Hey, y'all! I saw a listing on Mandy.com casting for a Pilot Pitch Presentation - unpaid. The role is spot on for me, but it seemed a bit odd for Mandy. Suddenly, all I could think was - have I not been on Mandy in a minute? Are they only offering student and unpaid work? Are people casting in the pitch deck phase?What's been your experience with it? What kind of work have you found on that site? I know the crew listings are hit-or-miss, but curious how it fares with cast. Share your best and worst below!

Acting for film or acting for theater?

Acting for film or acting for theater?

Posted on Nov 15th

I’m a beginner, and many people told me to start with acting for theater classes (because it’s a more „complete” kind of education), while I chose to start with acting for film classes, because I prefer that kind of acting. What are your opinions about this? Did all successful movie actors begin with theater acting?

What are good jobs for actors?

What are good jobs for actors?

Posted on Nov 15th

What are some good paying jobs that an actor can work? Is working part time better? If you’ve working full-time, how do you balance acting/auditioning and your regular 9-5?

LA based, Without a living situation.

LA based, Without a living situation.

Posted on Nov 15th

Hey everyone, I moved out here a few months ago with some people I considered family to pursue my acting career, and yesterday I was informed I was no longer welcomed to live there. I'm not sure what my next move should be, my financial situation isn't the greatest atm but I'm certain my current circumstances will change

Any other introverted actors out there?

Any other introverted actors out there?

Posted on Nov 15th

Feeling so insecure and just seeking a bit of reassurance. Im confident in my ability as a theatrical actress, but the only auditions Ive gotten lately have been for commercials. I get so insecure during callbacks for them it makes me doubt my entire existence. Everyone is so chatty and bubbly and outgoing whereas Im reserved and introverted. I dont experience this during theatrical auditions but something about the commercial audition process makes me feel like such an imposter and I hate it so much. I feel like the CDs want someone with that authentic bubbly spark which I cannot manufacture and feels so fake when I try to. I know I just need to change my own perception of it but I get so tired of pumping myself up only to be riddled with nerves and feel like a failure after every single callback. How can I just stop caring so I can just have fun with it? Is it possible to book stuff even if Im not the life of the party personality that seems required of every actor?

Getting an Agent (LA)

Getting an Agent (LA)

Posted on Nov 15th

Hello! I am to the point of my career where I feel like I am ready to get an agent (or a manager honestly, yes I know the difference). I feel like getting an agent and how to contact them is somehow something others know and I am just the fool. I would really appreciate any actual, concrete advice on how to do so. Is the best thing to do truly scouring IMDb for C-list actors and somehow finding their agents' emails? Is sending generic, yet semi-personalized emails to 50 agents whom I have no connection to the best thing to do? I am ready to put in the work, I live in LA, I am successfully and consistently booking short films and background work on my own, and I am ready to start taking the next step. Please, any advice would be genuinely appreciated. Be honest, harsh, helpful, I am not looking for an easy fix or an in, just anything anyone has to give.

Why do so many people in the industry hate super hero movies?

Why do so many people in the industry hate super hero movies?

Posted on Nov 15th

Ridley Scott just came out saying he thinks that superhero movies and boring and lack creativity, we also had Martin Scorsese talk about them, Ricky Gervais and also recently Denis Villeneuve. I get the points they make, about how a lot of them do lack creativity and use the same cookie cutter formula but are they really that bad for the industry? I mean they’ve kicked off a lot of careers for actors and you could say the same thing about the Bond movies. I mean I will admit I am starting to get tired of superheroes movies but you can’t deny they are fun and have allowed some amazing actors to be in the spotlight

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